stoughton's buzz davis: 06:21:03:11 up evil

Races for the Senate, U.S. House, etc. and other issues of national importance.
gozer
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Re: stoughton's buzz davis: 06:21:03:11 up evil

Postby gozer » Mon Nov 05, 2018 10:26 am

you must be joking wrote:So gozer let's ask a couple of questions.

Can you enter into Canada if you have a DUI conviction in your past?

Or how about China, Japan, Malaysia, Iran, Mexico, the UAE, New Zealand?

So if you can't enter into those countries with just a DUI conviction in your past that was a result of your being arrested for driving drunk not in their country, but in America, why should we in America have open borders for anyone to come here?

Many countries also have restrictions about entering into their country if you have had past criminal convictions.

Should we just allow MS-13 gang members who are a part of the caravans to enter into the U.S.?

And why is this happening right now? Right before the mid-term elections?

Who is paying for the food and water the people in the caravans are consuming as they are coming here?

With the average I.Q. here in America being 98 and a completely different culture than many countries in South America, how is someone who is from Venezuela where the average I.Q. is 84 or El Salvador where the average I.Q. is 80 or Guatemala where the average I.Q. is 79, who only speak Spanish and who no nothing of our modern culture or our way of life or our national mores is going to fit right into our culture here in America?

They are not!

Anyone who says otherwise is either trying to fool you or is simply delusional.


look, pal, i took the test and everything else just like people are supposed to and i would be the last person to cheer about queue-jumpers using any method and the refugee situation in austria, germany, france &c gives me pause too, especially when they weren't the ones who bought the bullshit about the so-called arab spring and started bombing shit, i just don't think sending 15 000 troops to the border to shoot poor people is a good idea, ok?

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Re: stoughton's buzz davis: 06:21:03:11 up evil

Postby gozer » Mon Nov 05, 2018 10:33 am

you must be joking wrote:So gozer let's ask a couple of questions.

.
.
.

With the average I.Q. here in America being 98 and a completely different culture than many countries in South America, how is someone who is from Venezuela where the average I.Q. is 84 or El Salvador where the average I.Q. is 80 or Guatemala where the average I.Q. is 79, who only speak Spanish and who no nothing of our modern culture or our way of life or our national mores is going to fit right into our culture here in America?

They are not!

Anyone who says otherwise is either trying to fool you or is simply delusional.


u mean the intelligence quotient tests that lots of people think have a structural bias in them?

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Re: stoughton's buzz davis: 06:21:03:11 up evil

Postby Shorty » Thu Jan 24, 2019 9:00 am

More good stuff from Buzz. I am not an AFT-W retiree but got this.

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: dbuzzdavis@aol.com <dbuzzdavis@aol.com>
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019, 11:00:25 PM CST
Subject: AFT-W Impact of Trump on US & World Economy? Will your WRS check go down this spring Will workers contribution go up?

Hello AFT-W Retirees and Members of the AFT-W Retiree Council

I hope you are all members of our Retiree Council (just $10 or so per year). If not pls., email Kathy Kreul at AFT-W HQ and tell her "Sign me up!" Kreul@aft-wisconsin.org

Attempting to guide the economies of a nation and regions of the world is far from an exact science. Many say that the actions of Mr. Trump in the White House are one of the main causes of our present economic difficulties.

The SWIB has a very good investment record and only a minority of the money is invested in the stock market.

But if you have been following the economy, or if you have a deferred compensation account in addition to your WRS account, you know the market has declined.

For the 2018, the Core Trust Fund lost 3.3% in value and the Variable Trust Fund lost 7.9% in value. NOT GOOD!

Our 5 year averaging formula is calculated each year and if losses impact the stability of the investment funds (the Core and the Variable) over a certain level then two things kick in.

1. We retirees may get hit with a REDUCTION of our monthly check.

2. Public workers and public employers may get hit with an INCREASE of their pension payroll tax/pension contribution.

As the ETF report, which you all got, says our Fixed check may get a spring REDUCTION of 1/2 of a percentage (0.5%) point. The Variable check may get a whopping 10% to 14% reduction!

What happens to workers and employers? The Contribution Table below the ETF report shows that for the last 31 years since 1989 the total amount of contributions the SWIB needed to invest to keep the WRS nearly 100% fully funded bounces around up and down from a low of 9.0% (4.5% worker's investment and 4.5% employer's investment) to a high of 14% (7% worker's investment and 7% employer's investment).

Note: This means if the worker earned $40,000 per year for the 2018 calendar year she/he would have to pay 6.7% of that or $2,680 into the WRS. The employer would also pay $2,680 into the WRS for a total of $5360 going into an account under that specific worker's name and Soc. Sec. number.

Four points:

1. The table below shows the total contribution rate for 2018 was 13.4%. As you all know most workers in America now no longer have a defined benefit pension plan sponsored by their employer. Reagan and the (mostly) boys in Congress let corporate America destroy the defined benefit plans and get out of helping their workers in retirement. Congress members let CEO's do this to workers while those Congress members get very high retirement pensions after only a few terms in Congress.

2. 401(k)'s and other investment vehicles for workers have been a massive failure except for those workers who may be in the highest 10% of all earners.

3. Result: In the coming years some experts expect the number of seniors living in poverty will rise from the present 10% (or a bit less) to 30% or so.

I ask you: What do you think will happen to the stability of our nation when 30% of the highest educated seniors America has ever had end up living in poverty after 40 plus years of working??? In the Great Depression of the 1930's brought on by the Wall Streets (of course), the one third of the elderly who lived in poverty lived in their childrens' basements, back rooms, attics or little shacks in slums and rural areas. So much for the good old days.

4. In a number of states good legislators like State Sen. Hanson from GBay have sponsored bills to establish a defined benefit pension plan for all WI workers in the private sector. Sadly most of the draft bills discuss total contributions of MUCH less than 13% or 14% the WRS has had to charge workers and employers. Thus the efforts to help private sector workers will be a failure unless legislators and voters get realistic as to what is needed and what is happening in the USA.

So just what has happened to upward mobility in American society? "More than two-thirds said it’s no longer commonplace for hard work to be a path from poverty to wealth, according to a new World Economic Forum poll." That is what the last article below reports.

Any of you remember Tennessee Ernie Ford? Well for tens of thousands of public and private school support staff and tens of thousands of teachers the old song I Load 16 Tons is more valid than ever.

You load 16 tons and whadoyouget, another day older and deep in debt, St. Peter don't call me cause I can't go
I owe my soul to the company store.

Over 200 years unions have advocated to help us get out of the rat race. All those hundreds of thousands of people who took action in the 1800's and the 1900's who made America what is was for the last half century or more.

And now we are being crushed once again by the 1%ers and their hired buddies who all have an insatiable greed for money and power.

Today in America 6.4% of all private sector workers are in a union and 37% of all public sector workers. All told 10.5% of all American workers are in a union. In the early 1980's we had a high of about 20% of all workers in a union.

Once again Reagan was a big union buster and corporate America and the blessed Congress all tagged along.

Bright spot is that AFL-CIO report union organizing is on an up swing and public approval of unions is at a 15 year high.

In the 1990 to 1993 period the AFT-W board walked the plank on a gamble that WPEC might be organized.

AFT-W staffer the dynamic Ralph Sawning (I may have spell my good friends name wrong) organized myself, Jill Hynum, and a small core of state workers, AFT-W borrowed like $120,000 when that was a heck of a lot of money and off we went. Three years later the 3,500 professionals in the bargaining unit voted like 60% percent to join an union and that union was the WI Professional Employees Council (WPEC). AFT natl. decided to back us in about 1991 and national invested about about $200,000 or $300,000 or more in the campaign and we won. Al Shanker invited myself and a few more to DC to congratulate us.

He was dying of cancer at the time but I well remember him saying "Remember I can not know what you need unless you tell me!"

A year or two later when the WPEC exec. bd. and AFT-W decided to go for a fair share election we asked Al for another $200,000 or so and blamb in came the money and the staff and we were on our way to another victory.

Organize, organize, organize it is the only thing that will save us and the little kids.

Educate, Agitate and Activate! And if the folks are a little pissed off at management or politicians that will get them working even harder!

Peace!
Buzz Davis, Retiree Council member in cold Tucson but not anywhere near as cold as WI!

======================

http://etf.wi.gov/news/ht_20190122.htm

News
Department of Employee Trust Funds
January 22, 2019


ETF Projections for Annuity Adjustments
Based on preliminary 2018 investment performance for the Core Trust Fund, ETF is anticipating either no change or a -0.5% adjustment (a decrease) to Wisconsin Retirement System retirees' Core benefit payments beginning May 1. In addition, those participating in the Variable Trust Fund will likely see a 10%-14% reduction in the Variable portion of their monthly benefit payments.

Preliminary 2018 Core and Variable Trust Fund investment results, announced by the State of Wisconsin Investment Board, are as follows (figures are gross of fees):

Core Trust Fund: -3.3%
Variable Trust Fund: -7.9%
ETF will announce the actual effective rates (applied to employee accounts) and annuity adjustments (affecting retiree annuities) in March, after Core and Variable Fund investment returns have been finalized and an actuarial analysis conducted.

When will retirees be informed about adjustments to monthly payments?
At the end of April ETF will mail retirees a personalized statement showing changes to their monthly payments for the coming 12 months, beginning May 1.

By law, WRS retirees’ annual benefit adjustments depend on investment performance – the WRS does not guarantee an annual cost of living adjustment. Instead, annuity adjustments (increases as well as decreases) are based on the investment returns of the Core and Variable Funds.

Core annuities cannot be reduced below the original amount set at retirement (“Core Floor”). Only previously-granted adjustments (dividends) can be reduced. There is no such protection (or “floor”) for Variable participants. A prolonged period of poor investment performance could result in the Variable portion of a retiree’s annuity being reduced below the original amount.

=======================

http://etf.wi.gov/employers/wrs_contribution_rates.htm

Members
WRS Contribution Rate History

General and Teacher Participants Year EmployerContribution Benefit Adjustment Contribution Employee**Contribution Total Rate
2019 6.55 N/A* 6.55 13.1
2018 6.7 N/A* 6.7 13.4
2017 6.8 N/A* 6.8 13.6
2016 6.6 N/A* 6.6 13.2
2015 6.8 N/A* 6.8 13.6
2014 7.0 N/A* 7.0 14.0
2013 6.65 N/A* 6.65 13.3
2012 5.9 N/A* 5.9 11.8
2011 5.1 1.5 5.0/5.8 11.6
2010 4.8 1.2 5.0 11.0
2009 4.5 0.9 5.0 10.4
2008 4.6 1.0 5.0 10.6
2007 4.6 1.0 5.0 10.6
2006 4.5 .9 5.0 10.4
2005 4.4 .8 5.0 10.2
2004 4.2 .6 5.0 9.8
2003 4.0 .4 5.0 9.4
2002 3.8 .2 5.0 9.0
2001 3.8 .2 5.0 9.0
2000 4.1 .5 5.0 9.6
1999 4.4 .8 5.0 10.2
1998 4.8 1.2 5.0 11.0
1997 5.0 1.4 5.0 11.4
1996 5.1 1.5 5.0 11.6
1995 4.8 1.2 5.0 11.0
1994 4.8 1.2 5.0 11.0
1993 4.8 1.2 5.0 11.0
1992 4.8 1.2 5.0 11.0
1991 4.7 1.1 5.0 10.8
1990 4.6 1.0 5.0 10.6
1989 4.9 1.0 5.0 10.9

Executives and Elected Officials 2019 6.55 N/A* 6.55 13.1
2018 6.7 N/A* 6.7 13.4
2017 6.8 N/A* 6.8 13.6
2016 6.6 N/A* 6.6 13.2
2015 7.7 N/A* 7.7 15.4
2014 7.75 N/A* 7.75 15.5
2013 7.0 N/A* 7.0 14.0
2012 7.05 N/A* 7.05 14.1
2011 9.4 0.0 3.9 13.3
2010 8.7 0.0 3.2 11.9
2009 8.5 0.0 3.0 11.5
2008 8.5 0.0 3.0 11.5
2007 8.5 0.0 3.0 11.5
2006 8.4 0.0 2.9 11.3
2005 8.3 0.0 2.8 11.1
2004 8.1 0.0 2.6 10.7
2003 8.1 0.0 2.6 10.7
2002 8.6 0.0 3.1 11.7
2001 9.4 0.0 3.9 13.3
2000 9.6 0.0 4.1 13.7
1999 9.8 0.0 4.3 14.1
1998 10.2 0.0 4.7 14.9
1997 10.2 0.0 4.7 14.9
1996 10.1 0.0 4.6 14.7
1995 11.1 0.1 5.5 16.7
1994 11.1 0.1 5.5 16.7
1993 11.1 0.1 5.5 16.7
1992 11.1 0.1 5.5 16.7
1991 11.1 0.1 5.5 16.7
1990 11.0 0.0 5.5 16.5
1989 11.2 0.0 5.5 16.7

Protective Occupation With Social Security 2019 10.55 N/A* 6.55 17.1
2018 10.7 N/A* 6.7 17.4
2017 10.6 N/A* 6.8 17.4
2016 9.4 N/A* 6.6 16.0
2015 9.5 N/A* 6.8 16.3
2014 10.1 N/A* 7.0 17.1
2013 9.75 N/A* 6.65 16.4
2012 9.0 N/A* 5.9 14.9
2011 8.9 0.0 5.8 14.7
2010 8.6 0.0 5.5 14.1
2009 8.1 0.0 5.0 13.1
2008 8.2 0.0 5.1 13.3
2007 8.2 0.0 5.1 13.3
2006 8.1 0.0 5.0 13.1
2005 8.0 0.0 4.9 12.9
2004 7.6 0.0 4.5 12.1
2003 7.1 0.0 4.0 11.1
2002 7.1 0.0 4.0 11.1
2001 6.9 0.0 3.8 10.7
2000 7.2 0.0 4.1 11.3
1999 8.0 0.0 4.9 12.9
1998 8.5 0.0 5.4 13.9
1997 8.9 0.0 5.8 14.7
1996 9.2 0.1 6.0 15.3
1995 9.6 0.5 6.0 16.1
1994 9.7 0.6 6.0 16.3
1993 9.7 0.6 6.0 16.3
1992 9.8 0.7 6.0 16.5
1991 9.8 0.7 6.0 16.5
1990 10.0 0.9 6.0 16.9
1989 10.1 1.0 6.0 17.1

Protective Occupation Without Social Security 2019 14.95 N/A* 6.55 21.5
2018 14.9 N/A* 6.7 21.6
2017 14.9 N/A* 6.8 21.7
2016 13.2 N/A* 6.6 19.8
2015 13.1 N/A* 6.8 19.9
2014 13.7 N/A* 7.0 20.7
2013 12.35 N/A* 6.65 19.0
2012 11.3 N/A* 5.9 17.2
2011 12.2 0.0 4.8 17.0
2010 11.3 0.0 3.9 15.2
2009 10.6 0.0 3.2 13.8
2008 10.8 0.0 3.4 14.2
2007 10.8 0.0 3.4 14.2
2006 10.7 0.0 3.3 14.0
2005 10.7 0.0 3.3 14.0
2004 10.6 0.0 3.2 13.8
2003 9.8 0.0 2.4 12.2
2002 10.4 0.0 3.0 13.4
2001 10.7 0.0 3.3 14.0
2000 11.8 0.0 4.4 16.2
1999 12.8 0.0 5.4 18.2
1998 13.2 0.0 5.8 19.0
1997 13.6 0.0 6.2 19.8
1996 14.2 0.0 6.8 21.0
1995 14.6 0.0 7.2 21.8
1994 14.9 0.0 7.5 22.4
1993 14.9 0.0 7.5 22.4
1992 14.9 0.0 7.5 22.4
1991 14.9 0.0 7.5 22.4
1990 15.4 0.0 8.0 23.4
1989 15.4 0.0 8.0 23.4
*The Benefit Adjustment Contribution was eliminated by 2011 Wisconsin Act 10.

**Rates may be different for employees who have collective bargaining agreements.


=======================

https://portside.org/2019-01-23/america ... d-mobility
Information is power. Our mission at Portside is to seek out and to provide information that empowers you -- that empowers the left. Every day we search hundreds of sources to connect you with the most interesting, striking and useful material. Just once a year we appeal to you to contribute to make it possible to continue this work. Please help.

Americans Have Lost Faith in Upward Mobility
More than two-thirds said it’s no longer commonplace for hard work to be a path from poverty to wealth, according to a new World Economic Forum poll.
January 23, 2019 Jo Confino IMPACT

, Kyle Reid Via Getty Images
DAVOS, Switzerland – People in the United States and other developed countries are losing faith in the capitalist system to improve their lives, according to a new global poll commissioned by the World Economic Forum, published on the eve of its annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland.

Almost two-thirds of U.S. respondents said it was no longer commonplace for hard work to be a sure path from poverty to riches, with only 10 percent saying it was extremely common.

The lack of faith in the current system to deliver upward mobility was even more marked in Western Europe, where only a fifth of respondents said it was common to be able to start poor and become wealthy through hard work.

Developing nations have the most faith in upward mobility, according to the poll, which surveyed more than 10,000 people over 29 countries. India showed the most optimism, with 69 percent of those polled saying they believe the existing system allows them to have control over improving their economic destiny.

Nearly 40 percent of respondents in India said they believe upward mobility was extremely common; in Japan and Italy, just 2 percent did, while in Spain this figure was just 1 percent.

While economies in the West have largely stagnated, there is a strong belief in India that its time has come and that, rather than a fear of losing what they have, many believe they are just half a step from making it.

Further evidence that residents of developed countries are finding that the current economic structures are no longer supporting their lives comes from the WEF’s flagship annual global risks report, published last week. The report goes beyond macro issues to also focus on how individual citizens are being negatively affected by trends such as automation, a lack of wage growth and the expansion of the gig economy.

The risk report, compiled with the help of about 1,000 experts, says that the dividing line between work and the rest of people’s lives has been blurred and that many families are forced to juggle several jobs while coping with other stressful issues such as child care, long commutes and caring for elderly relatives.

The WEF points to an analysis in Harvard Business Review that found that almost half of American workers surveyed said they are “often or always exhausted due to work” — up by a third in 20 years.

The WEF report highlights a link between automation and mental health issues and points out that “wider changes in the structure of work and in its place in society are a further source of potential stress. Job security and stability are in decline in many advanced economies, with real earnings growth sluggish or stagnating and less predictable ‘gig economy’ work expanding.”

So what is to be done?

The WEF emphasizes the importance of considering well-being rather than profit and growth at any cost. It warns that if we continue as we are, “beyond the economic risks, there are potential political and societal implications. For example, a world of increasingly angry people would be likely to generate volatile electoral results and to increase the risk of social unrest.”

A positive change in mindset could be advanced, in part, by changing the very idea of the American dream, which has traditionally been an ideal that anyone in the U.S. can make a good and prosperous life for themselves and their families through hard work.

This version of the American dream was created in the 1950s to encourage consumption and economic growth, according to Sarah Churchwell, a professor of American literature and public understanding of the humanities at the University of London. She said it is time for those on the political left to reclaim its original meaning.

The American dream “has long belonged to people on the right, but those on the left who are arguing for things like universal health care have a historical claim to the phrase, too,” she said in a recent interview with Smithsonian.

“The original ‘American Dream’ was not a dream of individual wealth; it was a dream of equality, justice and democracy for the nation. The phrase was repurposed by each generation, until the Cold War, when it became an argument for a consumer capitalist version of democracy. Our ideas about the ‘American Dream’ froze in the 1950s. Today, it doesn’t occur to anybody that it could mean anything else,” Churchwell said.

For more content and to be part of the “This New World” community, follow HuffPost's Facebook page.

HuffPost’s “This New World” series is funded by Partners for a New Economy and the Kendeda Fund. All content is editorially independent, with no influence or input from the foundations. If you have an idea or tip for the editorial series, send an email to thisnewworld@huffpost.com


upward mobility The American Dream
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=======================
From: moderator@PORTSIDE.ORG
To: PORTSIDELABOR@LISTS.PORTSIDE.ORG
Sent: 1/23/2019 1:55:49 AM US Mountain Standard Time
Subject: Union Membership in the U.S. Hit Record Low in 2018

Union Membership in the U.S. Hit Record Low in 2018

Irina Ivanova
January 21, 2019
CBS

The drop continues a trend that except for a pause during the 2008 financial crisis, has been ongoing since the 1980s, when the share of organized labor was roughly double what it is today.

Union membership in the U.S. continues to shrink, showing that organized labor still faces headwinds despite some recent victories.

Among American workers, participation in a union fell to 10.5 percent last year, from 10.7 percent in 2017 and 2016, with all demographic groups seeing a decline in membership. The drop continues a trend that except for a pause during the 2008 financial crisis, has been ongoing since the 1980s, when the share of organized labor was roughly double what it is today.

ust 6.4 percent of private-sector workers belonged to a union last year (a slightly higher figure, 7.2 percent, were represented by unions but were not officially members.) Real estate firms, utilities and construction industry players saw drops in the rate of unionization.

But some industries saw outsize gains. Education services added more than 100,000 union members last year, the most of any sector. Other industries that added union members include manufacturing, entertainment and waste services.

In the public sector, which has historically had a much heavier union presence than private businesses, union representation dropped by half a percent, to 37.2 percent. Membership grew among local government workers, shrank among state employees and held steady at the federal level.

Many were expecting public-sector membership to plummet in the wake of last year's Supreme Court decision in Janus v. AFSCME, which barred public-sector unions from charging fees to workers who did not join the union.

But the Labor Department's figures show only a slight drop. The figures also don't reveal whether workers did or didn't pay union fees, indicating only whether they are represented by a union.

The AFL-CIO, the largest organized-labor group, called 2018 "one of the best years in history" in a tweet, and pointed to the increases in unionization among professional workers. Last year, more than 28,000 professionals--ranging from graduate teaching assistants to actors—chose to unionize, the labor federation said.

Geographically, unions have the biggest presence in the northeast and on the West Coast. New York has the highest share of unionized workers, with 25 percent being represented by a union, although that share shrank last year.

The Southeast, which historically had a small union presence, saw gains in 2018. Alabama added 44,000 union members last year—the most of any state—while the share of workers in unions also crept up in Florida, Louisiana and Georgia.

Meanwhile, public approval of unions hit a 15-year high in 2018, according to Gallup.

First published on January 21, 2019
© 2019 CBS Interactive Inc.. All Rights Reserved."

Henry Vilas
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Re: stoughton's buzz davis: 06:21:03:11 up evil

Postby Henry Vilas » Thu Jan 24, 2019 9:23 am

tl;dr


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