Planes

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Beaver
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Planes

Postby Beaver » Thu Mar 22, 2018 11:34 am

Fires happen once every 8 days.

Fire on Delta Airlines Flight Highlights Danger from Lithium-Ion Batteries
Experts suggest storing rechargeable devices in carry-on luggage
https://www.consumerreports.org/faa/bat ... argo-hold/

""This could have been serious," says John Cox, a veteran pilot and airline safety consultant with special expertise on lithium-ion batteries in aviation. "Any time a lithium battery overheats the potential for fire and it spreading is very real. If the fire burned through the cargo hold lining, it could have threatened the airplane."

The small fire started in a toiletry bag in the cargo hold of the Delta Connection flight, and was extinguished before the plane took off. There were no injuries to passengers or crew and the flight proceeded to its destintion...

Fires involving Li-ion batteries have become frighteningly routine in the aviation world. In 2017, the FAA reported 46 incidents on planes or in airports, roughly one every eight days. By comparison there were 31 such incidents in 2016, only 16 incidents in 2015, nine in 2014, and eight in 2013. (No figures for 2018 are yet available.) “It’s one of the few rising risks in aviation,” Cox says."...

Passengers have a large role to play in preventing these fires. The first step is to follow the FAA guidelines regarding the transport of spare batteries on flights. Spare Li-ion batteries should not be stored loose in checked luggage but instead packed in a carry-on bag. The electrical terminals should be taped or otherwise protected to keep the battery from coming into contact with any stray metal devices, which could cause a short circuit.

Though the FAA doesn’t require it, Cox recommends carrying all devices containing lithium-ion batteries in your carry-on luggage. So, what should you do if your battery-powered device begins heating up or even smoking while you are on board? Cox says you should notify the flight crew immediately. Then, if possible, calmly move away from the burning device and let the flight crew do its job.

The FAA says the best way to cool a runaway battery is, believe it or not, with plain old water. “After extinguishing the fire, douse the device with water or other nonalcoholic liquids to cool the device and prevent additional battery cells from reaching thermal runaway,” the FAA says in a written advisory.
Last edited by Beaver on Wed Apr 18, 2018 9:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

Stebben84
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Re: Lithium-ion batteries causing fires on planes

Postby Stebben84 » Thu Mar 22, 2018 12:13 pm

Beaver wrote:Fires happen once every 8 days.


Sounds scary...doesn't it? Maybe you should stop flying...

There are 150,000 flights per day. That means in an 8 day stretch there are 1.2 million flights. Hence, 1 in 1.2 million flights have an issue. That is not to say it isn't serious, but we have bigger fucking fish to fry.

Madsci
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Re: Lithium-ion batteries causing fires on planes

Postby Madsci » Thu Mar 22, 2018 9:37 pm

Hey, he is still looking for a 1/2 naked woman!

Beaver
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Re: Planes

Postby Beaver » Wed Apr 18, 2018 9:44 am

Southwest passenger died after broken plane window nearly sucked her out
https://www.channel3000.com/news/nation ... /731158663

"Something in the engine broke apart midair and burst through the window, passengers said. A woman was sucked toward the hole where the window once had been as passengers struggled to pull her back in. "Everybody was going crazy, and yelling and screaming," Martinez said. "As the plane is going down, I am literally purchasing internet just so I can get some kind of communication to the outside world."

As the plane quickly descended and passengers continued scrambling to pull the woman away from the window, other passengers stuffed clothes and jackets into the hole, said Martinez, who was sitting two rows away from the woman. Those items got sucked out of the plane, too, he said."..

"We could feel the air from the outside coming in, and then we had smoke kind of coming in the window," Martinez said. In the chaos, it was hard to hear anyone. Flight tracking website Flightradar24 estimated the plane descended from 31,684 feet to 10,000 feet in about five minutes...

After trying to pull the woman back for several minutes, a man in a cowboy hat and a second man finally got her into her seat, Serafini said. A nurse aboard the flight performed CPR. "We started CPR on the lady, which we continued for about 20 minutes. We were still doing CPR when the plane landed," Peggy Williams said. "We made every effort that we could possibly make to save this woman's life."...

The woman...worked for Wells Fargo in Albuquerque, New Mexico, according to the bank. Southwest said hers was the first in-flight death in company history."

Henry Vilas
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Re: Planes

Postby Henry Vilas » Wed Apr 18, 2018 12:45 pm

"The woman...worked for Wells Fargo in Albuquerque, New Mexico, according to the bank. Southwest said hers was the first in-flight death in company history."

Wells Fargo's fatality record wasn't as good when they ran a stage coach line.


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