Tomato season is here

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snoqueen
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Re: Tomato season is here

Postby snoqueen » Sat Sep 30, 2017 8:03 pm

In my yard, the squirrels bring nuts and bury them -- mainly walnuts and acorns.

Next year, I pull up all the baby trees as soon as they sprout.

I might keep a pin oak back there some day if one comes up, but definitely not a walnut tree.

gozer
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Re: Tomato season is here

Postby gozer » Sat Sep 30, 2017 10:12 pm

raccoons and opossums (didelphis virginiana linnaeus 1758) like tomatoes too, i have discovered; raccoons are notorious for actually partially shucking maize then eating less than half of the kernels on the cob before dropping it on the ground and starting again the whole process of climbing the stalk then pulling the cobs down to ground level then breaking them off and shucking them . . . they have typical carnivoran dentition like a dog, fox, mongoose, or cat, or a civet or bear or whatever for that matter, whereas rodents and lagomorphs have the prominent incisors and little else and opossum teeth are essentially reptilian . . . north american (didelphid) opossums have 50 sharp teeth in a conical snout like the crocodilians and other similar reptiles

i would also conjecture that tree squirrels are not the most likely to eat tomatoes -- ground squirrels including mainly terrestrial chipmunk-gopher-prairie dog end of the spectrum and the glaucomys & pteromys flying squirrels at the other end are in fact omnivorous and will eat animals and even carrion in some cases . . .

if the holes in the tomatoes have a smooth edge, even look a little like how they gnaw a smooth oval into an acorn or other to extract the meat of the nut, then a flying squirrel (the only strictly nocturnal squirrel in north america) may have chomped in to a given piece of fruit to eat, drink, or both. somewhat more jagged bites and gnawing would point to the chipmunks, or perhaps rabbits or murioid rodents like rats maybe did it . . .

gozer
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Re: Tomato season is here

Postby gozer » Sun Oct 01, 2017 10:35 am

recent advances in the sciurid aero-space programme:




after all this time, a third species of north american flying squirrel or eichkatzerl from the pacific north-west and environs thought for 175+ years to be simply smaller, darker individuals of one the other or both glaucomys flying squirrels, was formally described this year, the humboldt's flying squirrel (glaucomys oregonensis bachman 1839) -- https://phys.org/news/2017-06-plain-sig ... irrel.html

these are the tiny flying squirrels which are strictly nocturnal and are of similar size to the pteromys flying squirrels of europe and asia, small enough to nest in bird houses . . . there has been speculation that all or most of the species of this type are the most numerous squirrels of any of the types in the areas in which they are found; since they are strictly nocturnal and live in the forest high up in the trees, they are still trying to figure that out for certain . . .

there are several other families of flying squirrels which range in size all the way up the size of a cheetah or larger . . . they glide (specifically they glide very efficiently -- volplane) like the various tribes of gliding possums (such as sugar gliders, petaurus breviceps waterhouse 1839, which are marsupials whereas rodents are placental mammals) rather than undertake powered flight like birds and bats. the north american and european and asian small flyihng squirrels can glide up to 150 metres or more and some of the largest species from south and south-east asia can glide more than a kilometre or even two if they can launch themselves from, for example, a very tall tree on the edge of a cliff . . .


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