Holiday Traditions

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jman111
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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby jman111 » Mon Dec 19, 2011 12:43 pm

As a child, it was always cannibal sandwiches on Christmas Eve.
Very lean, raw ground beef (e.g. ground round or ground sirloin) served open-faced on rye bread with thinly-sliced raw onions. Salt and pepper to taste.

We're reviving the tradition this year. I can hardly wait.

city2countrygal
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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby city2countrygal » Mon Dec 19, 2011 1:11 pm

jman111 wrote:cannibal sandwiches


Wow, does that take me back ... Dad used to eat those in the 70s and 80s. I was always too hesitant to try it.

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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby seashells » Mon Dec 19, 2011 4:11 pm

We have a couple that aren't anything big, but bring a smile to my face every year:

Santa's elves bring the kids new pajamas every Christmas eve. The children wear their new jammies to bed that night and then they have nice, clean pajamas for Christmas pictures the next morning.

Christmas dinner is called "The Feast," which cracks me up because in our house a "feast" is basically a buffet of junk foods the children don't get much of at other times of the year. Mozzarella sticks, soda pop to drink, tortilla chips, cheese pizza, mini corn dogs . . . that kind of stuff. The kids each get to choose a few items to add to the buffet, and there will be pulled pork for mr. seashells and I this year, too.

I think I may try that mac&cheese for this year's Christmas eve dinner. Maybe I'll cook up some cornbread to go with - thanks for the recipe!

Re: cannibal sandwiches. My dad used to eat those, with a nice cold PBR and an unfiltered Pall Mall cigarette as a chaser.

jman111
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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby jman111 » Mon Dec 19, 2011 5:00 pm

seashells wrote:Re: cannibal sandwiches. My dad used to eat those, with a nice cold PBR and an unfiltered Pall Mall cigarette as a chaser.

Yep, Dad always washed his down with PBR as well, accompanied by a Raleigh or nine.

Ahhh, Good Times.

city2countrygal
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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby city2countrygal » Mon Dec 19, 2011 5:42 pm

PBR me ASAP
Image

peripat
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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby peripat » Mon Dec 19, 2011 7:11 pm

We always got to go to the grocery store with our mother and pick out a TV dinner to eat on Christmas eve. That was a really big deal because it was the only time all year we got to have one. We saved the oyster stew for New Years eve.

city2countrygal
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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby city2countrygal » Mon Dec 19, 2011 8:19 pm

I'm liking the trend of eating junkfood on Christmas Eve. That's a neat idea, kind of fitting in with presents. Growing up I was rarely allowed sweets, mom worked for a dentist, so Halloween was about the only time I got candy. It's more memorable then, more special, I think.

I'm sorry O.J., but the specific kielbasa recipe will have to wait until after the holiday and my travels. There are two sources in family history books, and I can't ask my mom to type or scan it. She's not that techo-savvy. I do know, and she reiterated tonight, that there is no garlic in the recipe from the region of Poland where our family is from, and it's not smoked. Mom's BF is originally from NJ, and his Polish family had garlic in theirs and it was smoked. They did a low-key Christmas Eve, lentils and herring; whereas our Christmas morning is the simple meal: kielbasa, scrambled eggs, and a very eggy bread. Plus all the ketchup and horseradish you can handle! All the cousins would (and still do) pass around the horseradish and dare each other to take a big whiff. It's very cool hearing about the foron's traditions! I also noticed oyster stew is a favorite.

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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby O.J. » Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:12 am

Thanks, city2, and there's absolutely no rush, I don't think I'd get around to making it until after the holidays. I plan on 2012 as being the Year of Charcuterie. I like fresh kielbasa slightly better than smoked, so your family's recipe sounds like it would be right up my alley.

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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby kittenwithawhip » Tue Dec 20, 2011 12:37 pm

Our Christmas was a bit turned around. We celebrated on Chrismas Eve. We would start off with a cocktail hour for the adults with lots of gorgeous nibblies, then have a huge English feast of roast beef and Yorkshire pudding, lots of vegetable sides, potatoes, etc. We did oyster stew once in a while. Dessert would be a Buche de Noel decorated with meringe mushrooms and spun sugar spiderwebs. My sisters and I loved to cook and would try to bake every cookie in the December issue of Gourmet, but the real tradition was making Marzipan slices. These are a 3 layered bar with a butter cookie bottom, a layer of green marzipan and raspberry jam all topped with a chocolate icing. After dinner there was a big show of ushering us kids upstairs while we heard Santa (who sounded alot like my Uncle Buddy) come by and ask my Dad if we deserved any presents. After some hemming and hawing about our behavior, Santa departed and we ran downstairs to a dazzling display of presents to open by the fire while the adults had more Xmas cheer and we ate marizipan slices, cookies and sips of champagne (liquor was fast and loose in our house on the holidays, the kids could have wine with dinner and champagne after).

Actual Xmas day was sleeping late, eating a big brunch in our jammies and spending most of the day in a post party haze playing with our presents and eating any remaining cookies. Dinner was leftovers. Still in jammies if you really worked it.

That all changed after my oldest sister married into a big Polish family and we would spend Xmas day with them. Yep it was a sausage fest!

Even tho I am far away from my sisters now and really miss the days spent baking with them, the one thing we always ask each other is "Have you made your marzipan yet?" Then we know its really Xmas.

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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby Marvell » Tue Dec 20, 2011 1:17 pm

In the stockings:

An orange
A tin of sardines
A maple man
A magazine (usually Mad)

St. Lucia bread for breakfast.

On the tree - my hospital bracelet from the time I underwent an emergency appendectomy the week before Christmas.

Before the presents are opened, one of us reads Dylan Thomas's A Child's Christmas in Wales aloud.

"...and a book that told me everything about the wasp but why."

city2countrygal
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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby city2countrygal » Tue Dec 20, 2011 10:06 pm

O.J. wrote:I plan on 2012 as being the Year of Charcuterie.

That sounds like fun, O.J. Did you see the Madison Eats Agenda by Linda Falkenstein and Kristian Knutsen this week? The save the dates section at the bottom says the Underground Food Collective is doing four weekend workshops on meats: http://undergroundfoodcollective.org/event/weekend-workshops
My new years resolution will be to do more cooking classes like that!

Kittenwithawhip, your holiday celebration sounds like a fairy tale!
I can't figure out if it's French (Buche de Noel) of British (Yorkshire pudding) inspired, or both? Sounds like a really good time though!

Marvell, your stocking contents match mine growing up, except no maple man, maybe nuts instead (in their shell still, so they were work), and a little present/stocking stuffer like you mentioned, the Mad. We got our stockings on St. Nicks Day. Here's an audio link on YouTube for "A Child's Christmas in Wales": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjCJd9Bc-qA
I think this is a good one, as it's read by Thomas.

kittenwithawhip
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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby kittenwithawhip » Wed Dec 21, 2011 1:22 pm

It was traditionally British but none of us liked Christmas Pudding and we were all wanna be future pastry chefs. (Actually at one point or another we all were pastry chefs.) So the Buche de Noel was a fun project. We also made croquembouche every few years for variety. As I said, we loved to cook and it was one of the few things my sisters and I could do together without fighting like cats.
When it came to pastries and chocolate we were like a well oiled machine!

They live within a few hours of each other and will spend the holidays together. I know they are baking up a storm right now. I will be very lonely in my kitchen without them this year.

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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby O.J. » Wed Dec 21, 2011 1:38 pm

city2countrygal wrote:That sounds like fun, O.J. Did you see the Madison Eats Agenda by Linda Falkenstein and Kristian Knutsen this week?


I hadn't seen that, thanks for the heads up. I was planning on attending a whole hog butchering class at Bolzano, but this would save me a trip to Milwaukee.

city2countrygal
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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby city2countrygal » Wed Dec 21, 2011 7:28 pm

http://www.bolzanomeats.com/

Bolzano Artisan Meats, good resource in Milwaukee, O.J., thanks for that heads-up! I like to stop by Old World 3rd St., esp. Usingers, when in Milwaukee, walking up and down the river. http://www.usinger.com/

Kittenwithawhip, I think it's the combo of sisters and baking French goodies that has me dreaming. I have one brother and always wondered what having a sis would be like. It sounds like you all had a lot of holiday fun, even if the rest of the year wasn't as smooth. It was the same for me and my bro, I guess we were busy being good for Santa! :lol:

Seashells's idea of new jammies is a great idea that would be easy to do.
I did ask for new pjs this year, so I can start a tradition!

city2countrygal
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Re: Holiday Traditions

Postby city2countrygal » Fri Jan 06, 2012 1:06 pm

City2countrygal's great-great grandpa's fresh kielbasa recipe

Ingredients:
13 lbs ground pork (butt)
2 lbs ground beef
salt and pepper to taste
dried marjoram (1 heaping tsp per lb of meat)
pork casings

Directions:
Have butcher grind meat “medium” only once. Mix spices and meat and store in refridgerator overnight. Soak pork casings for at least 30 min. Rinse well by running water through casings (attach to faucet). Stuff casings with meat, forming links (approx 1 inch wide and 1 foot long). Tie off ends with string. Store in a covered container or plastic bags.

Cooking instructions:
Cover kielbasa with water in a large stock pot. Bring water to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and boil 1 hour (firmer texture) to 1 1/2 hours (softer texture).

Special notes:
Serve with ground horseradish (not creamy style), ketchup, bread, and butter.

Contact me for more info if wanted, his birth date was 1859, so I think it's safe to date the recipe pre-1900s. I'm still looking into the family history.


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