Take this job and shove it.

If it doesn't fit anywhere else, it fits here
auntgoodness
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Postby auntgoodness » Fri Aug 31, 2007 10:00 am

quitter wrote:The problem is that the boss is extremely stressed out right now and prone to emotional outbursts. I don't expect him to take the news very well, but I could be wrong. I'll find out this afternoon.

This is more nerve-wracking than breaking up with someone.


But just like breaking up with someone, there never seems to be a "good" time to do it. Do it quick like ripping off a band-aid. "I have news. I got a job offer. My last day is two weeks from today." Bam.

Ducatista
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Postby Ducatista » Fri Aug 31, 2007 10:04 am

Thanks for the flashbacks. :(

auntgoodness
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Postby auntgoodness » Fri Aug 31, 2007 10:27 am

Sorry, Duca. This whole thread is giving me flashbacks!

GenieU
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Postby GenieU » Fri Aug 31, 2007 11:20 am

Yeah, I've just said things along the lines of "A bigger, better deal came along and its an opportunity for me..." This line of bullshit is hard to argue with because as Americans we are all supposed to be motivated mainly by the Dollar.

Leaving a job is wonderful chance to be sadisticly cold-hearted: you say your boss is presently stressed? What a great time to pile on some more! See if any cracks develope in the facade! Be detached and ready to enjoy the ensuing drama. And ask yourself "How would they be doing Me if they were terminating my position?"

Quitting a job on your own volition is one of the last vestiges of freedom left.

I don't know the best way to recoup bennys-In the long run it won't matter much. Can you threaten to sue if they don't make good? Anyone know? or would this just create more headache's?

Dulouz
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Postby Dulouz » Fri Aug 31, 2007 11:55 am

"It's not you, it's me. really."

Tell them Vandalay Industries made you an offer you couldn't refuse.

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Postby SombreroFallout » Fri Aug 31, 2007 1:44 pm

GenieU wrote:Yeah, I've just said things along the lines of "A bigger, better deal came along and its an opportunity for me..." This line of bullshit is hard to argue with because as Americans we are all supposed to be motivated mainly by the Dollar.

Leaving a job is wonderful chance to be sadisticly cold-hearted: you say your boss is presently stressed? What a great time to pile on some more! See if any cracks develope in the facade! Be detached and ready to enjoy the ensuing drama. And ask yourself "How would they be doing Me if they were terminating my position?"

Quitting a job on your own volition is one of the last vestiges of freedom left.

I don't know the best way to recoup bennys-In the long run it won't matter much. Can you threaten to sue if they don't make good? Anyone know? or would this just create more headache's?


You can leverage the timing and information in your favor. And add to his stress in th process.

"About that raise--I know you're stressed right now, but it HAS been six months, will that be retroactive?"

If he says no, it lets you know where you stand. If he says yes, you secure the cash. If he puts you off, say:

"The reason I ask is because, well, finances are tight and the family needs to budget for THIS fiscal year... (long pause for response(and if none comes)) ... and I've been offered another job, so I do need to know where I stand with that raise, its retroactive-ness, and last year's review--so I can adequately weigh my loyalty here against this new opportunity, esp in light of what's best for my family."

It should motivate him to at least do the review--and the retroactive raise. If he blows you off, it at least increases his stress--and you can leave with a clear conscience. Get your retroactive cash, cash the check, and give your notice.

Some companies payout for vacation time. Just find out by reading th manual or asking somebody else. If they don't, take your vacation time before quitting, with a clear conscience. It's your time. Time is money, and you'll be paid for it--paid to look for a new job or prepare for the one you've just been offered, or just get stuff done at home. Hell, you could even start your new job--and go back to the old one to quit on the spot if you feel mal-treated.

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Postby snoqueen » Sat Sep 01, 2007 3:30 am

1) one way to find out what your references are saying is to sign up with an employment agency or temp agency. Often they will check and find out what your references are saying before they send you on an assignment. You don't have to GO on the assignment, or KEEP it -- but it's a way you can find out what your references were like.

2) don't burn your bridges if you can help it. I have crossed and re-crossed paths over 30+ years with a lot of workplace relationship folks, and you never know who will turn up where. This is a small town, in a way. Better to leave as few skeletons in your closets as possible and stay on good terms with people even if they seem insignificant to you at the time.

I remember a young kid who started work at one of my former places of employment -- he was just out of high school and barely able to grow a mustache at the time, and I was a couple decades older doing contract work. Twenty years later I ended up working for the guy. We got along fine, and he was a good boss -- but it helped that I had always been reliable and treated him with respect in earlier years. Keep your network in good shape.

3) As far as getting as many of the benefits of your old job as you can -- you can talk it over with them, but fundamentally in changing jobs you are taking a risk. Part of the risk is that you will be better off in the new position a year from now than you would be staying where you are. Don't look back for too long. If you've chosen well, the new place will make it up to you one way or the other.

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Postby Bwis53 » Sat Sep 01, 2007 8:06 am

That stuff about burning bridges is right on. The one boss I'm concerned about, set people up, to find out what their attitude was, and what they were saying. I worked with a person, who used to fight with their other boss-relative. But I could see blood was thicker than water. One day, my co-worker said some very lousy things about boss. To which I replied, I can understand the stress of being an owner and I never forget who's signing my paycheck. Later on, I saw two people get set up. After that, my boss in an aggravated state said, bad employee will "never work in this town again". True story.

It's better to make the job changes when you're young, climbing and not vulnerable to age prejudice. I'd worked at a place and proven myself, when I snagged a job I really wanted. I gave notice. One day, after most people had left, the boss reminded me of some benefits I was losing, in making this move. I said I always wanted to make this creative change, while I was still young. That turned into the sweetest work experience I've ever had. No regrets.

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Postby white_rabbit » Sat Sep 01, 2007 8:14 am

"If you're going to burn bridges, you better be a strong swimmer"

----Harvey Mackay, How to swim with the sharks without getting eaten alive


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