Fiction set in Madison

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Kenneth Burns
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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby Kenneth Burns » Tue Oct 21, 2014 8:13 am

Isn't "The Deep End of the Ocean" set in Madison? I seem to recall some second-unit shots of the Capitol building in the movie.

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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby kurt_w » Tue Oct 21, 2014 9:21 am

green union terrace chair wrote:
christopher_robin wrote:
kurt_w wrote:Yep, but I think House on the Rock is as close as American Gods gets to Madison.


They do stop in Madison in that book.

It's a very loose interpretation of Madison. They stop in a "cafe" somewhere on State Street, that's about as specific as it gets.

OK, that must be why I don't remember it. I actually don't care all that much for American Gods; of the half-dozen or so Gaiman books I've read, it's the only one I never bothered going back and re-reading.

I like the specificity of locations in The Long Earth. Mifflin Street, etc.

I actually picked the book up off the shelf without knowing anything about it, flipped it open to a random page, saw the words "Mifflin Street" and did a double-take. Then read the back cover blurb, which referred to Madison.

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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby green union terrace chair » Tue Oct 21, 2014 12:17 pm

kurt_w wrote:I actually picked the book up off the shelf without knowing anything about it, flipped it open to a random page, saw the words "Mifflin Street" and did a double-take. Then read the back cover blurb, which referred to Madison.

For those who haven't read it, Prachett and Baxter were in Madison for a Prachett Festival and they did a lot of their location work for the book then. Which explains why they get so much right and accurate.

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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby peripat » Tue Oct 21, 2014 1:52 pm

IVD by Greg Przywara (a checker at Woodman's) is sort of a crimestory/farce and Still Can't See Nothin' Coming, a coming of age novel by Daniel Grey Marshall are both set in Madison.

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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby dave esmond » Tue Oct 21, 2014 3:44 pm

The first one I thought of was Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner.

The first Tarzan briefly involves WI and Madison (maybe, it never really name places). But I love that it ends in WI.

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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby kurt_w » Wed Oct 22, 2014 7:14 am

Interesting. More and more suggestions, some obscure and some better known. Thanks.

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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby joerossm » Thu Oct 23, 2014 11:39 am

Crossing to Safety, from 1987 by Wallace Stegner. Morrison Street, Lake Mendota, and more.

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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby Galoot » Fri Oct 24, 2014 8:14 pm

Aren't many of Jacqueline Michard's books set in or around Madison? I recall reading one where I recognized a few of the characters--they were my neighbors on Eton Ridge when I first moved to Madison in 1997. I don't recall the name of that book though.

Kurt, thanks for reminding me of "The Long Earth". I brought it up on my tablet when I read your post and I'm now most of the way through it again. I did run across a rather large plot hole that I hadn't noticed before, though.

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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby kurt_w » Sun Dec 07, 2014 9:30 am

Galoot wrote:Kurt, thanks for reminding me of "The Long Earth". I brought it up on my tablet when I read your post and I'm now most of the way through it again. I did run across a rather large plot hole that I hadn't noticed before, though.

I ended up reading it (on an 11-hour plane flight). Overall I liked it enough that I'll probably go on and read the sequel.

It was vaguely amusing having all the references to Madison in the first few chapters, but as the book progressed that faded out.

I did notice that one character claims to be a reincarnation of a deceased Tibetan motorcycle repairman. Then, re-reading "Good Omens" last week, I noticed a brief reference (near the end) to a bit character who was supposedly "repairing radios in Lhasa". Do all Pratchett's books feature Tibetans who repair stuff? Or is it some weird coincidence that the only two of his books that I've read happen to be the only two with that odd detail?

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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby Detritus » Sun Dec 07, 2014 11:16 am

kurt_w wrote:I did notice that one character claims to be a reincarnation of a deceased Tibetan motorcycle repairman. Then, re-reading "Good Omens" last week, I noticed a brief reference (near the end) to a bit character who was supposedly "repairing radios in Lhasa". Do all Pratchett's books feature Tibetans who repair stuff? Or is it some weird coincidence that the only two of his books that I've read happen to be the only two with that odd detail?

Tibetan monks, or at least very deft parodies of Western notions of Tibetan monks, are recurring figures in Pratchett's Discworld series. One of them, a mysterious figure known as "Sweeper," is a central figure in several of them ("Thief of Time" and "Nightwatch"). He is nominally part of the order of the Time Monks, who use certain...technologies...to make sure that what is supposed to happen (or, in some cases, what was supposed to happen) actually does happen (or did happen). Sweeper follows his own way, however, based on the sayings of an urban housewife named Mrs. Cosmopolite, leading him to make observations such as "Is it not written, that it only goes to show."

I think Pratchett is best listened to, and I would say the same about Gaiman. There are several readers who do a great job with Pratchett, but Gaiman prefers to record himself reading his works, and he is (unlike a lot of authors) very, very good at it.

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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby kurt_w » Mon Dec 08, 2014 10:12 am

Detritus wrote:I think Pratchett is best listened to, and I would say the same about Gaiman. There are several readers who do a great job with Pratchett, but Gaiman prefers to record himself reading his works, and he is (unlike a lot of authors) very, very good at it.

Unfortunately, I can't stand listening to audiobooks. Annoys the $^#@!$ out of me.

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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby KGBear » Fri Dec 12, 2014 1:30 pm

And nobody remembered "The Goblin Reservation" by Clifford Simak???

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Re: Fiction set in Madison

Postby minicat » Fri Dec 12, 2014 2:43 pm

Alex Bledsoe's The Sword-Edged Blonde is set in an imaginary feudal land ... that amusingly includes a whole lot of Wisconsin town names.

Plus, it's a great read if you enjoy genre mash-ups (in this case, hard-boiled detective and sword-and-sorcery epics).


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