So what are you reading?

What books, zines or other pulp are you reading? What aren't you reading? What should everyone else read?
bluethedog
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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby bluethedog » Sat Feb 20, 2010 8:55 am

Last 3:

To Kill a Mockingbird - Harper Lee
Open - Andre Agassi
Born on a Blue Day - Daniel Tammet

Now:

Secrets of the Millionaire Mind - T. Harv Eker

Marvell
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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby Marvell » Mon Apr 12, 2010 11:44 am

The Cold Six Thousand by James Elroy.

They call it 'fiction.' I wonder.

If Elroy ever lost his Hemingway fixation he'd be a monster. As it is he's what you'd get if you spliced the literary DNA of Raymond Chandler and Gore Vidal.

If you don't hate J. Edgar Hoover after reading this book you will never hate anyone. Also, mormons.

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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby Kenneth Burns » Mon Apr 12, 2010 11:47 am

David Halberstam, The Best and the Brightest

Just finished: Victor Klemperer, I Will Bear Witness

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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby boston_jeff » Mon Apr 12, 2010 12:34 pm

Currently:
"The Girl Who Played With Fire"-Stieg Larsson
Follow-up to "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo." Psyched for the Swedish film adaptation of Dragon Tattoo screening at the Orpheum on Saturday as part of WI filmfest. Hollywood is sure to fuck it up eventually.

Recent:
"Olive Kitteridge"-Elizabeth Strout
Pulitzer-winning, well written but found the character very annoying and the stories grim yet trite. If you like thematic short stories about New England with overlapping characters, I recommend "Why the Devil Chose New England for His Work" by Jason Brown over this.

"City of Thieves"-David Benioff
Quick novel by a screenwriter (married to Amanda Peet) about the siege of Leningrad and two young men who must find a dozen eggs for a Russian officer's daughter's wedding cake in a few short days or else they will be executed. Loosely based on the memories of the author's grandfather.

"After the Quake: Stories"-Haruki Murakami
Really liked most of these. Like Murakami's Norwegian Wood, a much easier read than Wind Up or Kafka. I seem to read the hardest books by an author first, some kind of literary masochist.

The "Clash": Strummer, Jones, Simonon, Headon
Great coffee table book for Clash fans, loved it.

"Acquainted with the Night: A Parent's Quest to Understand Depression and Bipolar Disorder in His Children"-Paul Raeburn
Reading this was like work, because it was. Great info about our terrible health care system and how difficult it is to get services for mental illness...especially for children.

"Eating the Dinosaur"-Chuck Klosterman
After his foray into fiction it was nice to have vintage Klosterman back. Ranting about pop culture as only he can.

towanda
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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby towanda » Thu Apr 15, 2010 9:49 pm

Who Murdered Chaucer? A Medieval History by Terry Jones (yes, that Terry Jones), Robert Yeager, Alan Fletcher, Juliette Dorr, and Terry Dolan.

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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby buckyor » Sat Apr 17, 2010 10:54 am

Marvell wrote:The Cold Six Thousand by James Elroy.

They call it 'fiction.' I wonder.

If Elroy ever lost his Hemingway fixation he'd be a monster. As it is he's what you'd get if you spliced the literary DNA of Raymond Chandler and Gore Vidal.

If you don't hate J. Edgar Hoover after reading this book you will never hate anyone. Also, mormons.

There's an awful lot of paranoia in Ellroy's work.

Yeah, JEH is evil incarnate in this book. But the only Mormons who get much play are Wayne Senior (also evil, but I like where he winds up in the end) and Wayne Junior (one of the more sympathetic major characters in the book).

The other evil is Howard Hughes, although his evil is mostly crazy.

Now reading Blood's a Rover, which takes up where The Cold Six Thousand ends. No more Big Pete, which is too bad. But halfway through, it's still pretty engaging.

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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby Lily » Sat Apr 17, 2010 11:24 pm

I've read a lot of Heinlein, Asminov and Clark-just to mention a few of the masters in SF.

One of my favorite mystery authors Robert B. Parker who passed away in January this year. One of the authors who credited him with breaking new ground in the genre is Robert Crais and since then I've read 10 of his mystery novels in order of publication. I've also read two Mark Bittman books (how to cook everything, how to cook vegetarian), re-read Fried Green Tomato's, am currently re-reading Parker's "Pastime".

Ulysesses--huh. Had to read that one for a class but it was excruciating. Suppose you had to read Sons & Lovers too?

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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby buckyor » Sun May 02, 2010 12:49 pm

Kind of fitting that I finished Blood's a Rover this weekend, considering the conclusion of the book. It's worth a read, probably the most hopeful and optimistic of all of Ellroy's books; many of the antiheroes from the previous books become heroes, of a sort, in this one. Maybe Ellroy is softening as he ages.

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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby keelio » Mon May 24, 2010 12:44 pm

I finished Devil in the White City, by Erik Larson, over the weekend. It's a captivating, non-fiction account of events during the early 1890's catalyzed by the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The book covers several parallel plot lines with two primary standouts: contrasting the 'black city' of the nation's slaughterhouse with the 'white city' idealized by the exposition; and the rise of the first documented American urban serial killer. Life in those days was incredibly cheap.

Design professionals (i.e. - architects, landscape architects, engineers & planners) will find the confluence of the founding fathers of American design particularly compelling. That was my primary reason in picking up the book - professional curiosity about the signature event in defining the architectural ideal in the U.S. well into the 20th century. The insights into the psyche and society of Chicago in the 1890's were an eye-opener, making it very difficult to set the book down.

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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby boston_jeff » Mon May 24, 2010 12:46 pm

Thats a great book. I am reading "The Women" by TC Boyle and "Checkraising the Devil" by Mike Matusow.

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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby Uncle_Leaver » Wed May 26, 2010 9:23 pm

Babbitt, by Sinclair Lewis. Haven't read it since high school. It's amazing how relevant it all is.

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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby narcoleptish » Fri May 28, 2010 7:59 am

A Place In The country, by Peter H. Matson. Non-fiction narrative on the author's quest to build a home out of an old barn in the New England countryside. He approaches it with minimal planning and experience. Kind of feels his way along. Hits a chord with me because it's exactly how I approach building things.

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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby keelio » Fri May 28, 2010 3:17 pm

Currently hopping between a few titles, but kind of sticking to Michael Pollan's Second Nature. Ostensibly a book on gardening, it digs a little deeper into the human-nature relationship. I'm in the annual honeymoon phase with my garden, so am psyched to build that emotional attachment. Inevitably, mosquitoes, heat, humidity, and assorted veggie-munchers sour that relationship. So I'm always in search of the psychological tools to give stronger meaning to the garden, making it easier to get beyond the physical challenges. Thoreau gave up on his bean patch...I'm looking to stick with mine and hope Pollan helps in that regard.

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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby LaughingGirl » Fri Jun 11, 2010 9:30 pm

I'm on the food path lately. Recently read Barbara Kingsolver's Animal, Vegetable, Miracle, which was fantastic. I didn't necessarily learn anything new, but her writing is both moving and amusing. Now I'm reading Michael Pollan's Botany of Desire.

Next up I want to read a novel (don't do that much anymore) called The Imperfectionists by Tom Rachman, a British author. This is his first novel and I read a great review in the NYT that just hooked me.

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Re: So what are you reading?

Postby snoqueen » Sat Jun 12, 2010 6:53 pm

Sustainable Landscape Construction by J. William Thompson and Kim Sorvig.

This one (their second edition -- the first edition came out in 2000) strikes a balance between practicality and visionary ideas. Lots of detail about cool stuff like LED's in landscaping (how about hundreds of little low-voltage twinkle lights in your landscape instead of spotlights?), detail about the dark sky and silent landscape movements, interesting uses of water, use (or avoidance) of environmentally polluting materials, the effect of landscaping on other species, and the movement back toward hand labor in quality landscape maintenance in preference to environmentally questionable machinery.


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