Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

What books, zines or other pulp are you reading? What aren't you reading? What should everyone else read?
pjbogart
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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

Postby pjbogart » Sat Jul 21, 2007 7:37 am

Well, I wasn't quite nerdy enough to go to a midnight release, but I was plenty nerdy enough to rush out this morning and buy my copy of the new and final Potter tale.

I'm almost afraid to crack the binding, because I know that when it's over, it's truly over...

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Postby Dulouz » Sun Jul 22, 2007 4:43 pm

At chapter 14, I have found this to be her most unimaginative and tedious work of the series, but since I paid for admission, I might as well see how it ends.

The wedding scene was especially boring and blasé especially given the amount of literature available for pre-christian Celtic wedding ceremonies.

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Postby pjbogart » Sun Jul 22, 2007 10:06 pm

Well, I'm 500 pages in, and I think it's anything but boring or unimaginative. In fact, I think it might be my favorite book of the series so far, given the rather non-stop action combined with the moods of loneliness, abandonment and desperation. It's like Harry Potter meets "The Stand." I guess I miss Hogwarts, but I don't miss the silly talk of who's snogging who, which seemed to dominate "The Half-Blood Prince."

In sum, dulouz, I think you're a right foul git.

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Postby Harriet The Spy » Mon Jul 23, 2007 10:11 am

I agree with PJ that it's her best book yet. The last few took me about 300 pages to get into, but this one has a much quicker pace. The whole thing is more like the last 100 pages of her previous books. It's great that Harry, Hermione and Ron have been left pretty much to their own devices to figure things out -- there's no Hagrid or Dumbledore spoon-feeding them info and telling them what they need to do.

I really enjoyed seeing the way she used so many details from her previous books in this one. It's like a 759-page resolution. I knew they'd be searching for horcruxes in Book 7, but I hadn't predicted the Hallows part and that gives the book a lot of added depth and the element of surprise.

And, of course, it's great to finally see Snape's true colors.

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Postby pjbogart » Mon Jul 23, 2007 6:23 pm

I finished the book this morning before I went to work. I promise not to spoil anything. In retrospect, I don't think there's any doubt that I enjoyed this book more than any of the others. The book lacked the lengthy, boring filler that sometimes snuck into previous installments and each paragraph seemed to have some purpose in tying the trio to their current quest or explaining some recent development, or even something from a previous book. Yeah, you had to suspend disbelief for a lot of the convenient coincidences, but that's pretty much par for the course.

By the time you reach the final 200 pages or so, it's damn near impossible to put it down, as each chapter ends with some cliffhanging revelation or event that you simply must see resolved. I got up at 5am this morning and started reading to make sure no one had a chance to ruin the ending and I'm glad I did because allowing the end to unfold was well worth the investment.

JK Rowling will never win a Nobel Prize for literature, but she should be credited for getting tens of millions of people to read a 4100 page novel, and that's more than a little bit impressive.

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FINISH BOOK BEFORE READING THIS

Postby pattymcnutt » Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:05 pm

I have some mixed feelings about this one- it was definitely more interesting than book 6, which was waaayy too long and didn't really have much action in it. However, I felt like there were just so many things in this book that didn't really add up. It seemed kind of farfetched that they just happened to understand all of the completely random and convoluted "clues" that Dumbledore left them. Seems to me that if he put as much effort into defeating Voldemort (or helping Harry do so) as he did plotting this whole horcrux scavenger hunt, a lot of deaths could have been prevented.


I was also a little uncomfortable with a lot of Rowling's parallels to the Holocaust- rounding up all Muggle-borns, forcing them to register, "for the greater good" etc. On one hand, it does really give a clear picture of the depths of Voldemort's evil (and all the Ministry employees who are 'just following orders'), but at the same time it kind of made me uneasy for some reason....don't know why.

Finally, I thought the epilogue was so horribly cheesy, I was almost sick. Just the way that everything ended up in this neat little happily ever after picture, and the dialogue seemed really unrealistic and wayyy over the top. I am all for happy endings, but at least make the characters sound normal!

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Postby mrak » Tue Jul 24, 2007 8:15 pm

The only part that really surprised me was at the end, where all the characters renounced witchcraft and converted to Christianity.

Oh, shit, I probably should have said "spoiler", shouldn't I? My bad...

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Postby pattymcnutt » Tue Jul 24, 2007 8:22 pm

mrak wrote:The only part that really surprised me was at the end, where all the characters renounced witchcraft and converted to Christianity.

Oh, shit, I probably should have said "spoiler", shouldn't I? My bad...


Well at least you didn't spill the beans about the part where they capture Voldemort, rip off his mask, and discover that he is really Old Man McGee from the "haunted" amusement park. :D

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Postby Dulouz » Wed Jul 25, 2007 9:18 pm

pattymcnutt wrote:
mrak wrote:The only part that really surprised me was at the end, where all the characters renounced witchcraft and converted to Christianity.

Oh, shit, I probably should have said "spoiler", shouldn't I? My bad...


Well at least you didn't spill the beans about the part where they capture Voldemort, rip off his mask, and discover that he is really Old Man McGee from the "haunted" amusement park. :D


As a friend of mine says, it's not literature, but it is scooby doo done right. . . .

The ripping off of scenes from pop culture kept me from really getting into to some of the final moments. When Voldemort tells Snape that "he will come to me", all I could hear in my head was Darth Vader and the Emporer from Jedi.

Of course, it is a children's book and not really intended for adults, so I enjoyed it. It was a nice break from reality.

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Postby read to see the world » Tue Oct 02, 2007 3:51 pm

Even if some parts were cheesy or modern culture rip offs in the eyes of adults, the books (and movies) got millions of children to read long, complex books. They introduced them to other cultures, friends and enemies, right and wrong, standing up for what you believe, a ton of good things. Kids now WANT to read and have increased vocabularies. No matter what flaws the book may contain to some people, what’s Rowling has managed to do is incredible.

And it’s not even just with children. Adults that would normally not take the time to read are turning off the television in favor of a book. Isn’t that worth a cheesy scene or two?

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Postby morriskatze » Tue Oct 02, 2007 5:13 pm

Dulouz wrote:The ripping off of scenes from pop culture kept me from really getting into to some of the final moments. When Voldemort tells Snape that "he will come to me", all I could hear in my head was Darth Vader and the Emporer from Jedi.

Of course, it is a children's book and not really intended for adults, so I enjoyed it. It was a nice break from reality.


To be fair, Star Wars was based on ancient mythology and archetypal literary patterns, so in a way Rowling is just carrying on with the traditional hero pattern.

Some discomfort about the Holocaust similarities is definitely understandable. It was kind of weird, yet also seemed to carry her message about tolerance. I was just a little disappointed that she didn't quite extend that to the non-human magical creatures as she had hinted throughout the series with SPEW, etc. I know you can't put everything in one book, but it would have been interesting to explore how things (i.e. rights) could change/improve for centaurs, house elves, goblins, etc.

I really enjoyed how new things were revealed about a number of characters that either changed my opinion or deepened my understanding of them.

My husband, a sports nut, was disappointed that there was no mention of the pro-Quidditch career he thinks Harry had to have had at some point in his life - after all, Harry was the best Gryffindor seeker in a century. :lol:


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